REcall in Falstad: 7JUN – 20 SEP

REcall-project promoted to show the exhibition “Beyond Memorialisation” in the Falstad Memorial Center in Norway: the exhibition will last until the 20 of September with a three days Symposium closing event arranged to discuss the isuues related to the necessity to find new forms for monuments and memorials.

Download the Symposium  PR and draft programme

Here is the link to browse in the REcall book Beyond Memorialisation edited to collect all the work and the reflections developed along the project.

Moreover, is possible to check all ten REcall competitions proposals presented in the exhibition (browse the entries here) and to look all REcall documents edited and disseminated during the two years long project.

 

Competitions winners

Competition winners

REcall-project promoted a Competition for ideas on 10 sites belonging to 2 locations, 5 in the Falstad Center and 5 in Rome, to foresee which are the possibilities in this field. During REcall Final event in Berlin a jury decided and assigned four awards.

Here they are the winning entries:

Falstad competition
1st prize: Falstads tidevannspark
2nd prize: Shared roots

Rome competition
1st prize: Sister ACTualization
2nd prize: The 100 gram cycle

Here is the link to browse in the REcall book Beyond Memorialisation edited to collect all the work and the reflections developed along the project.

Moreover, is possible to check all ten proposals delivered (browse the entries here) and to look all documents edited and disseminated during the two years long project.

REcall final event

seminar 
30 April 2014

exhibition
30 April – 10 May 2014

Nordic Embassies-Felleshuset
Rauchstr. 1 – Berlin

During the international seminar there will be guest speakers and the opening of the Competition entries exhibition; we will also announce the competitions winner: two prizes for each location.

Free entry, but booking preferred: contact the Embassies

30 April 2014
Nordic Embassies-Felleshuset
Auditorium
h 15:00-19:00

Download: the Invitation, the Press Folder, the Introduction Panel, the Poster

Following you find the Seminar Agenda

Welcome (15:00 – 15:30)
Prof. Dr. Gennaro Postiglione
REcall coordinator-POLIMI-Department of Architecture and Urban Studies
Anne-Kirsti W. Karlsen
Minister Councellor and Head of Press, Information and Cultural Affairs-Norwegian Embassy
Prof. Dr. Nicolas Apostolopoulos
Freie Universität Berlin, Head of Center for Digital Systems

REcall presentation (15:30 – 16:00)
Places, people and stories: Workshop curators presentation
Dr. Anna Marie Fisker: Venice workshop
AAU-Food+Design-Department of Civil Engineering
Tone Jørstad: Falstad workshop
Director of The Falstad Memorial Center
Lecturer Viviana Gravano: Rome workshop
Academy of Fine Art Naples

Panel session 1 (16:00 – 16:40)
Chair: Prof. Dr. Marek Jasinski
NTNU-Institute of Historical Studies
Dr. Cord Pagenstecher
Freie Universität Berlin, Center for Digital Systems
Prof. Dr. Rob van der Laarse
UvA-Amsterdam School for Heritage and Memory Studies

Panel session 2 (17:00 – 17:40)
Chair: Prof. Dr. Wolfgang Weileder
UNEW-Fine Art School of Arts and Cultures
Prof. Renata Stih and Dr Frieder Schnock
Stih&Schnock Art Practice
Rainer E. Klemke
Kommunikationsberatung und Projektentwicklung
für Museen und Gedenkstätten

Seminar closing speech and discussion (17:40 – 18:00)
Prof. Dr. Marek Jasinski

Exhibition opening 18:00
Prof. Dr. Wolfgang Weileder
opening exhibition speech & announcement of REcall competition winners

Buffet & drinks

 

The Book of Fragments

The installation and the performance The Jewish Resistance Monument revisited have been developed by the art collective Mikel van Gelderen, Marianne Theunissen, Gennaro Postiglione, Jeroen Werner and Jurjen Zeinstra in collaboration with the historian Loes Gompes, during a four months collaboration.

The work was presented at Amstel 41 gallery the 22nd, 23rd and the 25th of February 2014, in occasion of the yearly celebrations of the Jewish Resistance and of the February strike.

The installation takes off by a reflection on a possible new vision for monuments, memorials and other commemorative forms exploited by the research project Recall. REcall is a research project funded by EU-Culture programme that challenges the investigation of new forms of interventions on Conflict Heritage and Landscape with the aim to overcome the trauma connected and with the precise goal to avoid the reduction and limitation of action around commemorative spaces.

The installation concept

Browse The Book of Fragments

The Book is part of the project The Next Monument

The Jewish Resistance Monument revisited

Performance
The Jewish Resistance Monument revisited
22-23FEB2014 12:00-17:00
25FEB2014 11:00-15:00 / 18:00-21:00
@ Amstel 41 gallery
Amsterdam

Browse  the installation concept

Browse pics from the performance

Browse The Book of Fragments

The Performance is part of the project
The Next Monument Amsterdam

Download the flyer

 

 

 

 

 

 

Beyond the monument

Talk
Beyond the monument
19FEB2014 18:00-21:00
Gerhard Hofland gallery

Invited speakers
Esther Captain (historian), Michaela Crimmin (RCA London), Ines Dantas (Architect, Innsbruck School of Architecture) Marek Jasisnki (Archaeologist, Norwegian Tech University), Guno Jones (independent researcher), Mark Pimlott (Artist and Architect, TU- Delft), Ihab Saloul (Memory Studies, UvA/VU Amsterdam), Rob van der Laarse (Memory Studies, UvA/VU Amsterdam), Vincent de Boer (Stroom-den Hague), Florian Wurfbaum (independent architect).

Browse pics from the meeting.

The Talk is part of the project
The Next Monument Amsterdam

Download the flyer

 

 

The Next Monument

The Next Monument

Amsterdam, February 2014

 

Are monuments only records of recorded histories? How can they act as a prompts for on-going reflection? Could a traditional monument be the starting point for individual commemoration? Does a memorial have to be fashioned out of bronze or marble to make a significant impression on our psyche? [James Young]

press release

 

Talk
Beyond the monument
19FEB2014
18:00-21:00
Gerhard Hofland gallery

In response to some of these questions, and in collaboration with the coordinators of the M4 gastatelier, Gennaro Postiglione/POLIMI will host an evening of discussion guided by specialists in the fields of archaeology, art, anthropology and history, from in and around Amsterdam at Gerhard Hofland gallery. During the talks, invited guests will be asked to present (up a max to 5 min) their responses to the concept of “The next Monument”, followed by feedback from the audience and further conversations.

 

Performance
The Jewish Resistance Monument revisited
22-23FEB2014
12:00-17:00
25FEB2014
11:00-15:00 / 18:00-21:00
Amstel 41 gallery

The discussion at Gerhard Hofland gallery acts as a precursor to the installation developed as a collective art work by Mikel van Gelderen, Marianne Theunissen, Gennaro Postiglione, Jeroen Werner and Jurjen Zeinstra (with the collaboration of the historian Loes Gompes and the Jewish Historical Museum) which will be on show at Amstel 41 gallery the 22nd, 23rd and the 25th of February (in occasion of the celebrations of the Jewish Resistance and of the February strike).

For more details, download the press release or browse in the The Book of Fragments

Download the flyer

Holocaust Memorial Day 2014

Mirjam Ohringer – Widerstand gegen die Nationalsozialisten in NL

For The Holocaust Memorial Day 2014, REcall visited Mirjam Ohringer, one of the Jewish Resistance fighter in Amsterdam during the nazi occupation.

She told many stories of those days and in a very gentle way remembered friends and relatives who were deported and who never came back from the concentration camps. She also recalled the decision taken not to use the possibility she had to emigrate in Switzerland: “she felt impossible to betray the trust all the Jewish community had in her” as in all the other Jewish Resistance fighters.

Here, it is possible to download an interview to Mirjam Ohringer published in English last December (2013) where she takes on some of the arguments of our talk and of the interview presented above (from 2012).

West Wednesday

POLIMI has been invited to participate at the one-day seminar “Shifting AiR strategies” arranged by id11 in collaboration with Tetterode Collective on the 14th DEC at Lijm & Cultuur space. POLIMI will present the on-going research-by-design focused on “The Next Monument” on new forms of Memorialisation of conflict memories. The work is part of the REcall-project, a research by-design funded by EU Culture Programme 2012.

As part of the same initiative, on the 11th DEC, within the Amsterdam West Wednesday programme, POLIMI will present “The Next Monument” also in the premises of Tetterode Marble Hall and M4gastatelier (where actually POLIMI is developing a residency connected with REcall project) by means of an “Instant Exhibition”.

Download the Tetterode Collective program or go to the id11 homepage.

A new paper edited [AAU]

REcall Venice: Exploring disciplines of visual literacy through difficult cultural heritage 
Tenna Doktor Olsen Tvedebrink, Anna Marie Fisker & Hans Ramsgaard Møller 

Visual Literacies 7th Global Conference: Exploring Critical Issues (Athens 2013)

 

Abstract 
According to James Elkin visual literacy is interpreted as material representations, which communicate knowledge and create insight through their visual appearance. Based on the EU Cultural Heritage project ‘REcall’, we argue that visual literacy also can relate to interdisciplinary knowledge rooted in architectural environments.

Our paper takes departure in the project ‘REcall’ that seeks to formulate a new role of the architectural environment based on invigorated research on the cultural landscapes of WWI and WWII. Based on interdisciplinary workshops employing creative approaches and tools; artists, architects, museologists and archeologists question the role of architectural environments when dealing with war heritage. Today there are still traces left from WWII in the European architectural environments, traces that by visual literacy represent unpleasant memories. However, these visual literacies have shaped our environment, yet, slowly the collective memories are fading as the physical signs vanish. As time moves on, the visual literacies become merely fictive if nothing is done to preserve them, but what knowledge should be told?

Our thesis is that there is a link between war memories and cultural identity. Our paper deals with the difficult war heritage, and we explore how we can use visual literacy to move beyond the critical local context into general constructs, and further how visual literacy is connected to the visual thinking. On the background of the ‘REcall Venice’ and ‘REcall Falstad’ projects, we advocate that new actions recalling the visual literacies might prevent knowledge from being forgotten. In order to communicate meaningful knowledge about the past with caution and decency, we explore how this recalling is based on the practical interdisciplinary process of “historicization” using the visual literacies rooted in the architectural environment to interpret and reconstruct history, facts, form and fiction. A curriculum design in, or across disciplines connected to and through visual literacy.

Key Words: Visual literacies, architectural environment, interdisciplinary, art, archaeology, museology, architecture, difficult heritage, collective memory.

Download the full paper here or read it on REcall-project ISSUU page

M4gastatelier Amsterdam

In the framework of REcall project, POLMI team has started an Artists Residences in Amsterdam, c/o the Artists’ Collective Tetterode which three/four times per year set out a Call for Artist Residence project. POLIMI got the term 01NOV2013-28FEB2014.

The programme is to develop other design experiments and researches within REcall ideas & goals, working on Amsterdam “WWII Places&Memories” involving artists from the Tetterode Collective to challenge the difficult heritage of the city.

Here is the general programme for the Residency:

WWII Resistance had different variations that were less evident, less striking, than those that marked the great and truly fundamental actions of war and guerrilla of the armed formations. These variations were “Minor” Resistances that acted through single sabotage events, actions of disturbance or simply of rejection of the oppression, led out by a single individual or by unexpected and unorganized groups, but that did in fact contribute to Italy’s liberation and to the diffusion of the idea of opposition as a possibility. Almost always, these actions are remembered as a localized trauma, known to few, neglected or even erased by the official celebrations and hence hidden from common knowledge. In the places where these actions took place, there is no trace of past events and if there is some mention of it, it is mostly a manifestation of a mute (and in no way shared) rhetoric.

Continue reading M4gastatelier Amsterdam

Competing Memories feedback

The first three days of the Competing Memories Conference are over, and we have moved to the Westerbork Camp to summing up what discussed and presented during the seminar: many cases, different ideas about the future of research in Conflict Heritage Studies, but also dissonant positions about the role of Monuments/Museums/Memorieals in this concern.

More and more, there is the need to go beyond “sacralization” of memorial sites to foreseen a productive & participatory approach to war heritage.

Here you find the link to download the Abstract brochure

 

other initiatives #007: Competing Memories

On behalf of the entire team I am pleased to present you the final program of the “Competing Memories” conference. The online version can be found here. A conference booklet (including practical information, the final program and all the abstracts) will be made available soon.

We would appreciate it if you could disseminate the program within your network. Registration is obligatory for participants, but free of charge (excluding a contribution for lunch).

If you haven’t done so yet – please inform us about your arrival, departure dates and travel/accommodation costs.

As always, if there are any further questions do not hesitate to contact me.

Looking forward receiving you soon in Amsterdam.

Best wishes,
Competing Memories team

download the programme

visit the website: http://competingmemories.tumblr.com/

Rome WS presentations 130913

The last day before leaving Rome, the five REcall workshop teams have presented a summary of the work undergone during the week: all groups had interesting suggestions for their working sites and each of them also presented a good collection of documents and information gathered during the stay. This was due the incredible collaborative approach of Routes Agency who assisted POLIMI to arrange the workshop.

Following you find the link of each presentation:

story 01: Bread Ovens 

Julia Heslop, Enrico Forestieri, Sophie Anderton

story 02: Ugo Forno

Isabel Lima, Lily Garnett, Toby Lloyd

story 03: The Quadraro

Juan Carlos Mejía del Valle, Henar Riviere, Roberto Uribe Castro

story 04: Prists & Nuns

Arno Geesink, Julia van der Krieke, Beata Labuhn

story 05: The Carabinieri

Tim Wouters, Filip van Dingenen, Annabelle Milon

 

 

REcall publication

Re-enacting the past
Museography for conflict heritage

The book takes inspiration from one of the most significant subject of debates of the recent years, that is to say the role of memory connected with Conflict Heritage. Linked as they are to unpleasant stories, they represent a patrimony that is difficult to manage. However, we believe they have the potential to resonate beyond their local contexts and work toward the construction of a collective identity on a European scale. This book presents a critical anthology of essays for the first time grouped in according to three main topics, archaeology, art and museography, and offers different approaches and new perspectives on the theme of Conflict Heritage.

The work, edited by Michela Bassanelli and Gennaro Postiglione, is published by LetteraVentidue and results from the previous research “Museography for Conflict Archaeology” that merged (and inspired) in “REcall-project”.

We hope this Reader will critically contribute to the on-going discussion about Conflict and Difficult Heritage.

Browse in the book!

 

Falstad-WS presentations 130629

The last day before leaving Flastad Center, the five REcall workshop teams have presented a summary of the work undergone during the week: all groups had interesting suggestions for their working sites and each of them also presented a good collection of documents and information collected during the stay in the center. This was due the incredible collaborative approach of Falstad staff.

Following you find the link  of each presentation:

AHA (site: The Camp area)
Members: Julia Hutzler (architect), Christine Guerard (artist), Thurid Andreßen (architect) Advisors: Dr. Eszter B. Gantner (historian)

Disfocused (site: The Falstad Forest)
Members: Ilaria Rondina (architect), Pau Garcia Sanchez (archaeologist), Federica Romoli (artist)

Teceel (site: The Commandant’s house)
Members: Elisabeth Eulitz (architect), Cecylia Skwirzynska (architect), Tobias Doll (archaeologist)

RRR (site: The Fjord)
Members: Fabrizio Bellomo (artist), Piergiorgio Italiano (interior designer), Birgitte M. Fjørtoft (archaeologist)

Chalk circle (site: The path from the Camp area to the forest)
Members: Micol Rispoli (architect), Lùa Coderch (artist), Giovanni Murro (archaeologist) Advisors: Daniela Iannella, Emanuela Murro

 

Here is the link to check the press feedback

 

 

Rome WS book

rome

Contents

 

01. REcall project

About

.

02. Rome Workshop

Minor geographies of day-to-day resistance

Stories

· Story01: The “Attacks” on the Ovens and the Women of Ponte dell’Industria

· Story02: The Schoolboy Partisan: Ugo Forno

· Story03: The Quadraro “Republic” and Operation Whale

· Story04: The silent resistance of priests and nuns

· Story05: The Clandestine Front of the “Carabinieri”

 

03. Others.

04. Workshop agenda

05. Browse and/or download the Workshop book 

 

01. REcall project

About

REcall seeks to formulate a new role of the architectural environment based on invigorated research on the cultural landscapes of WWI and WWII and strengthen the attention on the management, documentation and preservation of this heritage.The project regards heritage as a dynamic process, involving the declaration of our memory of past events and actions that have been refashioned for present day purposes such as identity, community, legalisation of power and authority. The project group see that any cultural landscape – i.e. architecture- is characterized by its dynamism, temporality and changing priorities in social perception.We stress
that the research we develop will generate the values to be protected tomorrow. On the strength of this account, our project proposes the development of sustainable and innovative architectural practices for reuse, valorisation and communication of the XXth Century European Conflict Heritage considered as Cultural Landscape.

.

02. Rome Workshop

Minor geographies of day-to-day resistance

The Minor geographies of day-to-day resistance in Rome analyses various symbolic episodes of the Roman resistance during the period between September 8th 1943 and June 4th 1944. The Armistice between Italy and the Allied forces, known as the “Armistice of Cassibile”, was signed in secret in the city of the same name on September 7th 1943. On September 8th, at 18.30, the armistice is first announced by General Dwight Eisenhower via Radio Algiers, and later confirmed at 19:42 by Marshall Pietro Badoglio in a proclamation transmitted via EIAR. On September 9th, the Savoy Royal Family flees Rome and takes refuge in Apulia, an area already in the hands of the Allied troops. Rome is declared an “open city” due to the presence of Vatican City and the inestimable value of its historical monuments. In actual fact, the Nazis attack the city on the same day as the Armistice and occupy it. The occupation lasts 271 days, until the final retreat and the arrival of the Allies between June 4th and 5th 1944. Given its status of “open city” (or “neutral territory”), Rome has long figured in the popular imagination as a city liberated ahead of its time, and therefore an area without any major form of resistance. In fact, during this period the city undergoes a vicious Nazi-Fascist regime which sets up five different areas of detention and torture, as well as perpetrating several mass killings (the best known of which are those of Fosse Ardeatine and Forte Bravetta). However, what is less well-known about this time is the day-to-day brutality which both minor and more powerful military leaders and the Nazi-Fascists continued to impose on the unarmed civilian population – a total lack of freedom of expression, widespread hunger, continual confiscation of personal property and public humiliation. Many civilian groups, often appearing spontaneously from the grass roots and driven by basic survival needs, opposed this treatment, and constructed a complex network of day-to-day resistance. Many men, women and even children were tortured to death, or suffered unprecedented violence and deported to extermination camps or German factories as slave labourers. This civil resistance has not always received the same attention as that of the armed resistance groups active in the city. Moreover, these numerous and far from insignificant episodes are commemorated today mostly with just a plaque or by the name of a location, or the awarding of medals for civilian courage more than sixty years on.
Five different stories were suggested to the groups participating in the ReCall project, all linked by a single idea – the actions of one or just a few citizens, who believed in the possibility of changing a history which appeared, at the time, much bigger than they themselves. In two cases, that of Ugo Forno and the massacre of women at the Ponte dell’Industria, there is no political organisation as such involved, but rather the conscience of an individual or of a mere few individuals who saw their actions as a duty both to themselves and towards the community as a whole. In the case of Quadraro, we discuss how the everyday resistance of an entire district, consisting of both armed conflict but also of small daily disturbances, led the Nazi-Fascist madness to deport almost the total male population of the area. This a clear demonstration that a civilian community can push a powerful military organisation into crisis. Two other cases show how, in different ways, existing groups can partially waive their own rules in order to help their fellow citizens. We discuss the heroic resistance of the Carabinieri in Rome and the silent but powerful defiance of the Catholic Church.
We would like to cite here an illuminating text, The Coming Community. by the Italian philosopher Giorgio Agamben, which we believe illustrates precisely how these episodes foreshadow his idea of a “coming community”: “The fact that must constitute the point of departure for any discourse on ethics is that there is no essence, no historical or spiritual vocation, no biological destiny that humans must enact or realize. This is the only reason why something like an ethics can exist, because it is clear that if humans were or had to be this or that substance, this or that destiny, no ethical experience would be possible-there would be only tasks to be done. This does not mean, however, that humans are not, and do not have to be, something, that they are simply consigned to nothingness and therefore can freely decide whether to be or not to be, to adopt or not to adopt this or that destiny (nihilism and decisionism coincide at this point). There is in effect something that humans are and have to be, but this something is not an essence nor properly a thing: It is the simple fact of one’s own existence as possibility or potentiality . But precisely because of this things become complicated; precisely because of this ethics becomes effective.” (Agamben 2001; 39).
The individual choices of each resistance member were not dictated by conscience, or a will to surrender their lives to an epic destiny (something “worthy of being recounted” and therefore remembered), but were rather the actions of those who felt an urgent need to oppose the current state of affairs by choosing to pursue active participation. And the memory of these episodes has a strong resonance in the present, inasmuch as it represents the idea of “community”, not a community which is pre-destined to achieve a heroic destiny, but one which lives, and by living expresses its full potential for resistance. The Jewish philosopher Hannah Arendt, in her essay on the concept of Active Life, writes: “And so the language of the Romans, perhaps the most dedicated population to political activity that has ever existed, took the words “living” and “being among men” (inter homines esse), and respectively “dying” and “ceasing to be among men” (inter homines esse desinere) as synonyms” (Arendt 1957, 9).
The importance of tracing these stories on the geography of Rome today relates to a need to try and create a new definition of “community” or “civil society” in a present which does not address its own recent past, which removes its historical black holes and, at most, “celebrates” instead of reinvigorating the places which were the scene of such significant events. The removal of the memory of these episodes, which are considered “minor” in the official history, is not an innocent act. Identifying those individuals who opposed living conditions which they considered unjust implies highlighting the importance of voices from below; it implies reinforcing and reaffirming civil action.
In addition to the historical data and the common principles which unite these five areas of work, we believe it is important to remember that Rome bears very few traces of the horrors of the Nazi-Fascist period, and that the few that are preserved are celebrated in a very traditional, very low-key and completely uncommunicative way. We therefore feel that these five “approaches” to the difficult memories of these dramatic episodes, and to the living, active memory of those ordinary citizens who opposed the horror, may construct a path which can be continuously implemented, and even project itself into the future. As well as Quadraro, there are entire neighbourhoods who lived their own history of civil resistance from below. Alongside the heroes of Ponte dell’Industria, there were other women murdered for a loaf of bread, such as Caterina Martinelli, killed with her small daughter in her arms (who injured her spine as she fell with her mother). We remember also Teresa Gullace, portrayed in the film Rome, Open City; and others like Ugo Forno, such as the dozens of partisan runners who were taken and murdered, often tortured even though they were merely children, the parish priests and police officers, the dozens of doctors and nurses captured and tortured, summarily executed for assisting partisans or Jews, or the railway workers who risked their lives to open sealed trains to free the deportees. This Minor geographies of day-to-day resistence could turn out to be an infinite space in which to construct an “imaginarium” for the identification of those actions that were part of a “normality” made exceptional by the times.
Gesmundo Giacchino, shot at the Fosse Ardeatine, writes : “Be aware that our actions are not the isolated actions of a group of terrorists, the consequences of which do not echo among the masses. We are the leading edge of a struggle of which the vast majority of people are a part. If it were not so, we could not survive these actions, and we would be cursed forever. But the people, the workers, love us, respect us and protect us; they are ready to rise up for us. Even our enemies know this, and that is why they resort to reprisals, and not only in Italy”(Bentivegna 1983, 93).

The five focal points of our work raise five different issues related to the difficult memories of the horror of the Nazi-Fascist domination of Rome, and Italy as a whole; they also recount five different attempts at opposition to that regime, ending in both victory and defeat. The five stories have tragic endings, but they also pinpoint five locations; they are physical and material, but also moral and ethical; they are waiting to be transformed into places of memory, not monumentalised, passive memory, but rather as places of experience which can be renewed and revived for

Story01: The “Attacks” on the Ovens and the Women of Ponte dell’Industria

Group: Terrain vague

DonneDelPonte

The winter of 1944 is characterised in Rome by the dramatic rationing of food. Each family, regardless of size, is permitted just 100 grams of bread per day. Many ovens cannot bake because the Nazi-Fascists commandeer the flour to make white bread for the Fascist hierarchy and the Nazi invaders. The women waiting at the bakeries are often denied even the 100g of bread, after hours of queuing. Between January and April 1944, some of the mothers begin spontaneous attacks on the ovens. After these first attacks, the women are supported by the partisans, as told by Carla Capponi. On the April 7th 1944, a large group of women and children, from the Ostiense e Portuense neighbourhood attack the Tesei oven, which secretly produces white bread for the Nazis. The PAI, Police of Italian Africa, call the SS and ten women are taken. They are led onto the parapet of the bridge, Ponte dell’Industria, in Ostiense and shot in cold blood. Father Efisio, parish priest of the nearby Church of St. Benedict, is called on to try and stop the massacre, but arrives to find them lying dead on the ground. His testimony, along with others, recounts how one of the women, the youngest, had been dragged from the river and had suffered a gang rape by the Nazi-Fascist troops, before being shot in the head. For many years following the end of the war, the names of the murdered women remain unknown; they were ordinary people who were driven to attack the oven out of hunger alone. Subsequently, thanks to the patient reconstruction of events carried out over years by journalist Cesare De Simone, the full names of all the victims were finally known. Immediately after the war, the Italian Parliament has a plaque erected to commemorate the massacre, at the request of the female parliamentarians of the Communist Party, but this is first vandalised and then destroyed permanently. Recently, at the location of the shooting, a marble memorial stone has been erected surrounded by a small flower bed, placed at the corner of the bridge. This small monument is hardly visible and shows only the names of the women killed, and a bas-relief of anonymous female faces. The massacre at the Ponte dell’Industria is a significant event that demonstrates the importance of everyday, unarmed resistance, carried out by people who attempted to oppose the daily abuses and violence of the Nazi-Fascists. The women involved in the oven attacks are an important symbol of resistance from below, often forgotten by the narratives of “wider” history, specifically because they represent clear evidence of a widespread dissent of civilian society in a time of dictatorship.


Visualizzazione ingrandita della mappa

Sources:

Story02: The Schoolboy Partisan: Ugo Forno.

Group: Blank

Roma 10 09 01 riproduzione foto di famiglia   Ugo Forno

Ugo Forno, known as “Ughetto” to his classmates, is 12 years old and lives in Via Nemorense 15, in the middle-class suburbs of Rome, with his father Enea Angelo, a clerk at the local Finance Office, and his mother Maria Vittoria Sorari . Having finished the second year of Middle School (Luigi Settembrini in via Sibenik) in May of 1944, he has just been accepted into the third year with full marks. On the morning of June 5th 1944, the day after the official arrival of the Allies in Rome, Ugo leaves the house, saying that he is going out to play. He goes to the central square of the “quartiere” and hears that the Americans are arriving to liberate that area of the city. But several groups of Nazis are still fighting. Around the river Aniene, some Partisan groups are preparing the ground for the arrival of the Allies, but Ugo learns that there is a team of Nazi engineers who are planning to blow up the railway bridge over the river which is the main route for the Allied entry into Rome. Ugo takes up position in a farmhouse in vicolo del Pino, not far from his own house, armed with weapons that he has found hidden in a nearby cave, and convinces some other older youths to attack the Germans. These are Antonio and Francesco Guidi, sons of the owner of the farmhouse and Luciano Curzon, Vittorio Seboni and Sandro Fornari, three of their labourers. This small group of improvised resistance fighters prevents the Germans from blowing up the bridge. As they retreat, however, they fire three mortar rounds at the young partisans resulting in a direct hit on the head of young Ugo. He dies instantly. Ugo Forno is the last to fall in the battle for the liberation of Rome. Documents unearthed by journalist Felice Cipriani, who, as part of the Ugo Forno Foundation, has worked for years to keep the memory of this episode alive, attest that Ugo had applied to join the resistance a few days before, but had been denied the opportunity because he was too young.
Recently, the National Railway has named the high speed rail bridge over the Aniene after Ugo Forno – the very bridge saved by his actions. There is also a small plaque in Nemorense Park, near the house of Ugo Forno. The Middle School he attended has dedicated its main hall to him and carries out activities in his memory with the current pupils. The Ugo Forno Foundation has also identified a small garden in the same area which will be dedicated to Ughetto and his actions that day.
The story of Ugo Forno was chosen because this young “man” put the common good before his personal well-being. Ugo represents the idea that one single action, though life-threatening and, ultimately, fatal, can change the course of history. The memory of this episode, which only this year has been honoured with the Gold Medal of Valour, speaks of that resistance from below which is often disregarded as it affirms the lack of consent of the common people in times of dictatorship.


Visualizzazione ingrandita della mappa

Sources:

 

Story03: The Quadraro “Republic” and Operation Whale.

Group: Trojan horse

Quadraro

The Quadraro was (and still is) a working-class suburb of Rome. As with all the other similar suburbs, it was constructed by the Fascists to keep the peasant masses and the underclass outside the walls of the capital. It arose from slums built by the poor using scavenged materials. The Quadraro, however, soon takes on the appearance of a well-organised and well-constructed neighbourhood, home to many immigrants from the south of Italy and Abruzzo, mostly labourers and construction workers. Soon after the Armistice, and up until the Liberation, the Quadraro becomes a centre of spontaneous civilian resistance, where small daily actions, from attacks on the Nazi-Fascist vans to assaults on the bread ovens, create a situation which makes it difficult for the invaders to enter the area. Everyone participates in this “light” resistance, consisting of conversations in bars and small acts of sabotage and attacks – entire families, even Don Gioacchino Rey, the local parish priest of Santa Maria del Buon Consiglio.
The Chief of Staff of the Reich, Kesselring, describes the Quadraro as a “hornet’s nest”. In Rome, it is said that to escape the Nazis you can hide either in the Vatican or the Quadraro. In close collaboration with the Sicherheitsdienst [SD, Security Service], the intelligence service of the SS, Lieutenant Colonel Herbert Kappler organises a punitive action aimed at the entire neighbourhood – the so-called “Operation Whale.” At dawn on April 17th 1944, the Quadraro is surrounded by Nazi soldiers and all men between 16 and 60 years of age, who are able to work, are rounded up (there is still debate about the exact figure, but we are talking about some 950 people, as evidenced by some survivors). They are first gathered together at the Cinema Quadraro, then in the buildings of Cinecittà Film, and then deported to the concentration camp of Fossoli in Emilia Romagna, from where they are sent to Germany and sold as slaves to various German factories. The men of Quadraro thus become part of a huge number of workers deported from all over Europe, now referred to as “Hitler’s slaves.” This is not just about people being forced into hard labour, but rather an actual form of organised killing – no pay, food only once a day, dormitories in wooden shacks full of insects and disease in temperatures as low as 20 degrees below zero, no form of medical care. The workers are forced to march for miles outdoors in cloth shoes in order to reach the factories. Less than half of those deported from Quadraro get back home and most of the returning survivors will die as a result of the abuse suffered in Germany. The Quadraro deportation was the largest deportation of civilians in Italy after that of the Jews from the Roman ghetto. For decades these Roman citizens were not even given the status of victims of Nazism and Fascism, because the Germans had made them sign, at gunpoint, a letter testifying that they were going to Germany to work as volunteers.
Although documentary evidence of the forced deportation was found almost immediately, there was a long wait before a Gold Medal for the Resistance was awarded to the quartiere. Written and oral testimonies of the time clearly show that Kappler wanted to physically eliminate the men and boys of the neighbourhood because their continual resistance was both unbeatable and unbearable for the Nazis.
Currently in Quadraro there is a Monument to the deportees, and a very active District Committee dedicated to the memory of that time. The Carlo Moneta Professional State Institute for Trade and the Benedetto da Norcia State High School have carried out several studies on the events of 1944 in Quadraro. Claudio Siena, president of a local cultural association, also organises a popular annual cycle race to commemorate that terrible episode.
The groups involved in the ReCall project will therefore be able to interact with different physical locations in the neighbourhood which commemorate the facts in a “traditional” way, as well as with associations, committees and citizens who are active “memory-bearers”.

Sources:

Story04: The silent resistance of priests and nuns

Group: Diogenes

MEMORIA,  "PIETRE INCIAMPO" PER DON PAPPAGALLO E FAMILIARI SPIZZICHINO - FOTO 3During the Nazi occupation, Rome is home to the Pope and the Vatican state. There has been much discussion about the position taken by Pope Pius XII, on the papal throne in 1939, in relation to the German invaders. Two opposing theories explain the ‘silence’ of the Vatican at this time. One theory sees the Pope as close to the Nazis due to their role as anti-Soviets and anti-Communists in Europe; the other, however, explains the neutrality of the Vatican as a way of being able to stay in the city and provide clandestine assistance. For our purposes, it is not important which is the correct explanation. In the project we do not intend to discuss the higher echelons of the Vatican, but rather the dozens of nuns, priests and monks who secretly helped those in need during those terrible days in Rome. Convents, seminaries, confraternities and even places of cloistered communities, hid Jews, gave shelter to military deserters, resistance fighters, fugitive political dissidents and their families, and to the partisans, regardless of religion or political views. Some of these events, which led to the deaths of clerics and other members of the Church, are both well-known and even commemorated, but many others have remained in the shadows, similarly to a multitude of other minor acts of day-to-day resistance in Rome. Priests were considered so dangerous that the fascist political police sent their men to listen to their sermons in church to assess whether they constituted incitement against the Nazi-Fascists.
Everyone knows the story of Don Pietro Pappagallo, shot at the Fosse Ardeatine; that of Father Giuseppe Morosini, tortured and then shot in Via Tasso in Forte Bravetta, accused of hiding weapons for the partisans. But not everyone knows the incredible story of Don Paolo Pecoraro who, on March 12th 1944, stood up in the midst of the crowd listening to the Pope in St. Peter’s Square, with a red flag and began shouting his protest against the Nazi invaders. The Pope had him arrested and brought to the Vatican, but only to save him from the hands of the German military. We should also not forget Don Gioacchino Rey of the parish of Santa Maria del Buon Consiglio, who was violently beaten for his outspoken opposition to the Nazi round-up and deportation of the men from the Quadraro; he managed to ensure that the under-16s and over-60s were not taken. Many documents mention Don Volpino of the parish of Santa Maria della Provvidenza in via Donna Olimpia who took in and saved at least 65 Jews, as well as resistance fighters and politicians. A key role in this work of aid and rescue was played by all the parish priests and church members of the villages and the poorest neighbourhoods of Rome. These include the nursing sisters of the Ramazzini Sanatorium who even helped the men of the “Bandiera Rossa” partisan company; Don Adolfo Petriconi and his curate, Don Parisio Curzi, of the parish of SS. Redentore in Val Melaina who were arrested and sentenced to death, though ultimately saved by a last minute stay of execution; and Father Libero Raganella, parish priest of the poor district of San Lorenzo.
Many remember the incredible episode of the Nazis who entered San Paolo Abbey (which had taken in about 620 fugitives) with weapons drawn and took away several politicians, escapees of the draft and Jews, despite a further attempt on the part of the monks to help them escape.
A special role was also played by the nuns who hid many Jewish women and girls. We mention, as examples only, the Augustinians of Santi Quattro Coronati, and the sisters of San Pancrazio al Gianicolo church .
This section of the project will highlight those ‘minor’ episodes concerning the men and women of the church, Christians, Catholics, who, by acting in accordance with their beliefs, ended up tortured and/or killed. We also focus on a real and spontaneous network which allowed the refugees to escape, but also to work at organising the resistance from their hiding places in different centres of worship around Rome.Sources:

Story05: The Clandestine Front of the “Carabinieri”

Group: Pigeon the message

Carabinieri

On 7th October 1944, the German High Command in Rome definitively disbands the Carabinieri. The SS bursts into the barracks, deporting between 1500 and 2500 police officers (“carabinieri”) to concentration camps in Germany. In the documents of General Herbert Kappler, we read that the deportation of the Carabinieri was necessary in order to proceed with the round-up of the Jews in the Roman ghetto, because the Carabinieri were the only ones who could sabotage the operation.
Marshal Rodolfo Graziani gives the order to disarm the Carabinieri, the most dishonourable thing for a military man, especially if implemented by other Italians, in this case the PAI (Police of Italian Africa). The Carabinieri felt that a fascist coup had taken place within the brigade. The Nazi-Fascists had every reason to neutralise the Carabinieri who, being fiercely loyal to the king, regarded the Germans as invaders.
The Carabinieri have just fought against the Germans in Rome, on September 10th 1943, at Porta San Paolo, and Naples, with offensive operations and sabotage (such as interruption of railway lines, roads and bridges, and the withdrawal of anonymous tip-offs about anti-fascists from censorship offices). The Carabinieri in Rome begin to desert in increasing numbers. The eleven thousand police on duty in early September have been reduced to only five thousand a month later. The defectors take their weapons with them to hand over to the partisans and begin sabotaging German operations.
Over two thirds of the Carabinieri, who never wanted to swear allegiance to the Republic of Salò and the Nazis, go underground and form themselves into bands. To organise the different groups of military deserters, the Clandestine Military Front for Resistance (FMCR) is created, coordinated by retired General Filippo Caruso and Captain Raffaele Aversa, and engages in active combat alongside the Roman Resistance.
Many of these soldiers are captured and even tortured to death in the SS prison in Via Tasso. Most of the police, even under torture, do not provide any information to the Germans. Colonel Frignani is tortured in front of his wife so that she can encourage him to talk; but his wife pretends not to recognise him. Brigadier Angelo Ioppi, who specialises in acts of sabotage (such as throwing a bomb on a column of fascists in via Tomacelli on October 28th 1943, or the destruction of two German trucks at the Coliseum) is arrested, interrogated at the prison in Via Tasso and tortured 28 times – he will become a permanent invalid as a result of this treatment. During interrogation, Ioppi continually repeats the same phrase: “I am a carabiniere of the King.” A total of 35 carabinieri die in the defence of Rome, twelve are shot at the Fosse Ardeatine, 111 are killed in retaliation for the bombings, and about 2000 are deported.
The deportation of the carabinieri was an act of revenge on the part of the Germans for the desertions and sabotage. The deported carabinieri come from the Legioni Lazio, Rome, Allievi, the barracks of Podgora, Pastrengo, San Lorenzo in Lucina and Piazza del Popolo, as well as a variety of other barracks. Some are warned first and manage to escape, becoming part of the FMCR.
The carabinieri who are deported to the extermination camps in Germany have their status of military prisoners removed, on the orders of Hitler himself. They are thus considered simple prisoners, traitors, and become part of the “final solution”. The Nazis wanted the Italian soldiers to work in the factories and the German countryside in order to free up German men to fight at the front, but the Italian soldiers refuse any kind of collaboration, even at the risk of their own lives. The soldiers who manage to return from the camps are not understood. What they have experienced and the choices they have made, following a specific ethical code of never cooperating with the Nazis, seem impossible to communicate, impossible to understand, and for many years their experiences are removed from the story of the Roman resistance. Only in the 1990s do some German historians become interested in the stories of Italian soldiers in Nazi concentration camps.
In this section the intention is to highlight stories that are seldom recounted, and often removed, about the active and important role that the Carabinieri played in the Roman resistance, preserved largely in the historical archives and the Carabinieri Historical Museum, established in 1925.


Visualizzazione ingrandita della mappa

Sources:

.

03. Others

Submission

The submission for the second stage of the competition will include the following material:
– 4 rigid 5mm panels in A1 format (illustrating the proposal: tech drawings and visualizations with captions)
– A max 6 mins video (600 MB max) (Optional): Vimeo link
– A model of the proposal at a large scale (A1 size: the whole panel is to be used)
– Optional: a detailed model of part of the proposal (e.g.: an installation) on a A1 size board (the whole panel is to be used)
– a word file with title + 300 words synopsis + name of group participants
– Project Diary: a 64 pages booklet (the template will be delivered by organizers) illustrating the whole work process and the final proposal delivered including sketches, methodology, etc. (min 2000 words description in the whole booklet)

Calendar
– Workshop in Norway 24-30 JUN 2013.
– Workshop in Italy 8-14 SEP 2013.
– Deadline for the on-line submission* of projects based in Norway 30 OCT 2013 (h: 24:00 Italian time).
– Deadline for the on-line submission* of projects based in Italy 15 JAN 2014 (h: 24:00 Italian time).
– For the physical delivery of all required materials: all required materials should also be sent, with exclusion of the video, in analogical form according to the format requested to the Closing Event venue (see 7_competition entries).
– Final workshop: place and dates will be announced at a later stage.

* For the on-line submission, photos of the model/s should be included in the form of PDF file in A4 size with a sequence of 10 pics.

Jury
The jury for the second phase of the competition will be composed by the partners of the project and other invited professionals in the fields of architecture, archaeology and art to be confirmed.

Prizes, reimbursements and subsequent commissions
At the end of the second phase the 10 teams will be presenting their proposals.
The jury will evaluate all 10 proposals and award the following prizes:
· Location Norway first prize: 3000€.
· Location Italy first prize: 3.000€.
· Location Norway second prize: 2.000€.
· Location Italy second prize: 2.000€.

Refunds
– Traveling expenses refund will take place after the delivering of both train/flight tickets and boarding cards to the Partner responsible (NTNU for Falstad WS and POLIMI for Rome WS and for the Final Event)
– All groups selected for the second phase may obtain a refund of max 1.000€ each as a compensation for the expenses that this stage involves (see section_7, second stage). Reimbursements will only be made upon delivery of related receipts/invoices to responsible Partners (NTNU for Falstad WS and POLIMI for Rome): the refund will take place (after the opening of the final exhibition) and upon delivering of receipts only concerning products related to the materials to be delivered.

Ownership of materials and rights to exhibit and publish
Results of the competition and the whole research process (from the Venice WS to final workshop) will be collected in a catalogue.
All participating groups applying to the ‘Call for applications’ formally accept to keep the authorship of their works, but give the organisation the right to use the material for any purpose connected to the dissemination of the process and the results of the workshops. The organisation reserves the right to use this material without any restriction or fee. (see section_14).

.

04. Workshop agenda (8-14 SEP 2013)

Minor geographies of day-to-day resistance

by Routes Agency Rome and POLIMI Milano

 

Meeting room: IED room-Master, via Casilina 56, Roma

 

Sunday, September 8

 

Morning

WS participants placement in hotels as follows:

Participants (8-14 SEP 2013)
Partners (8-15 SEP 2013)

℅ B&B stay at Rome
Via Tiburtina antica n°13 – 00185 Roma
(rif. Francesco Tarno/tel. +39 339 4017822 / info@stayatrome.it

38_Terrain Vague
22_Blank

 

℅ BB San Lorenzo
Via Tiburtina antica n°12 – 00185 Roma
rif. Ludovico Galeotti/tel +39 064468463 / sanlorenzorooms@gmail.com

05_Trojan Horse
40_Diogenes
30_Pigeon the message

 

℅ Domus Sessoriana
Piazza di Santa Croce in Gerusalemme, 10 /12 – 00185 Roma
rif: Simona Duggento/tel. +39 0670615 / info@domussessoriana.it

All Partners members participating

 

Afternoon

Guided tour at Fosse Ardeatine, at 14 pm, only for the participants arrived in the morning

 

Evening

– 17.00 IED room-Master: formal welcoming

– individual presentations

– 20.00 social aperitif (details will follow)

 

Monday, September 9

Morning

– presentation of the WS to all the groups and assignment of two interns of the Master “Curatore Museale IED” to each group

– Introduction lecture on the Italian Resistence

 

Afternoon:

 3 groups go to survey each specific site: meeting witness and first approach to the fieldwork

– 2 groups start with desk research: browse books, documents, videos and movies

 

Tuesday, September 10

Morning 

– 2 groups go to survey each specific site: meeting witness and first approach to the fieldwork

– 3 groups start with desk research: browse books, documents, videos and movies

 

Afternoon

– 16:00: lecture of the President of “Casa della Memoria” (House of Memory) in Rome, about the Resistence in Rome

– 17:00: question time (collective: partners and participants)

Wednesday, September 11

– all groups: individual work in the field and/or in the meeting room

– REcall partners: visit all sites

 

Thursday, September 12

– 10:00 face-to-face meeting with individual groups (30 min each)

– all groups: individual work in the field and/or in the meeting room

 

Friday, September 13

– all groups: individual work in the field and/or in the meeting room

– 16:00 closing seminar: presentation by individual groups and follow up

– closing aperitif / pic-nick

 

Saturday, September 14

– departure

 

 

With the collaboration of:

REcall WS2: Falstad / 21-30 JUN 2013: Agenda

REcall WS2: Falstad / 21-30 JUN 2013: Agenda

Day 1 (24th June_Mon)

Morning
· Arrival

Afternoon / evening
17.00   WS Opening
· Welcome speech (Tone)
· Introduction of participants and individual teams
· REcall project goals (Gennaro)
· Presentation of Falstad WS Agenda
19.00    Dinner

Day 2 (25th June_Tue.)

Morning
08.00     Breakfast
09.30     Introduction Falstad (Arne)
10.30     Tour through sites (all 5 groups together) (Falstad Forest – Marianne S; The Pathway Arne/Tone/Marek)
12.00     Lunch

Afternoon
13.00     Tour through sites (continued) (The Camp – Marek – The Falstad Landscape Project – Tone)
16.00     Question time (collective) (Gennaro)
19.00     Dinner

Day 3 (26th June_Wed.)

Morning
08.00     Breakfast
09.30     Workshop / Internal meeting (Gennaro)
12.00     Lunch

Afternoon
13.00     Lecture 01 (interdisciplinary pbl***) (Gennaro)
14.00     Workshop / Internal meeting
19.00     Dinner

Day 4 (27th June_Thu.)

Morning
08.00     Breakfast
09.30     Workshop / Internal meeting (Gennaro)
12.00     Lunch

Afternoon
13.00     Lecture 02 (archaeology) (Marek)
14.00     Workshop / Internal meeting
19.00     Dinner

Day 5 (28th June_Fri.)

Morning

08.00     Breakfast
10.00     Departure Trondheim by bus – lunch in the bus
11.00     Trondheim sightseeing (free time)
14.00     Nidarosdome Cathedral – guided tour (Tone)
15.00     Trondheim Museum of Fine Arts – seminar and panel discussion (Tone)
17.00     Departure from Trondheim and short visit to Dora
20.00     Dinner

Day 6 (29th June_Sat.)

Morning
08.00     Breakfast
09.30     Workshop / Internal meeting (Gennaro)
12.00     Lunch

Afternoon
13.00
· Closing session (10min. presentation**** from each group) open to locals (municipality)(Gennaro/Marek)
· Discussion
· Technical meeting (explaining the submission requirements)

19.00    Closing event
(bbq on the seaside) (Falstad)

Day 7 (30th June_Sun.)

Morning
09.00    Breakfast

· Departure

from other initiatives #006 International open call for entries: GHOST TOWN CHALLENGE

Karosta translates as War Port (or Navy Harbour). It is used to be a closed secret military town for the Russian Empire, and later for the Soviet military. As Latvia regained its independence in 1990, the Soviet military had to leave Karosta. As a result the population dropped dramatically from 25 000 to 6 000, leaving many abandoned buildings behind which have fallen into a state of partial or complete disrepair.

Homemade Dessert in collaboration with Liepaja City Council and a number of local artists has created a design brief on Karosta´s revitalization.

This competition invites you to present your architectural vision for a multi-purpose cultural centre that would include exhibition hall, library, and conference centre with possible entertainment as retail zones and a restaurant.

This is the first of the competition series on Liepaja city. This international architecture vision competition is open to everyone. Teams must have no more than 4 people, no professional qualification is required.

Registration Deadline: 10.11.2013
Submission Deadline: 01.12.2013

Go to the competition web-page

from other initiatives #005 International open call for entries: July 22 memorial sites

In commemoration of the terror attacks of July 22, 2011, the Norwegian Government has decided to establish national memorial sites in Hole and in Oslo.

Public Art Norway (KORO) is responsible for the projects’ artistic direction and now inviting artists to submit proposals to an international open call.

For more information and submission guidelines, please go to: www.minnesteder.no

a new paper edited [POLIMI]

Re-appropriation: Museography for Traumatic Memories

by Michela Bassanelli, Gennaro Postiglione
in: Int AR – Difficult Memories: Reconciling Meaning, Vol. 4/2013

 

abstract

In the debate on Contemporary Memory, two are the terms included constantly in the incipit of the major works of the literature on this topic: obsession and hypertrophy (Huyssen 2003, Agazzi and Fortunati 2007, Macdonald 2009). The theme of Memory has become a subject of discussion in different fields of knowledge: from social to biomedical sciences, from visual culture to media. In the last ten years the critics (Caruth 1995, Antze and Lambekm 1996, Edkins 2003) have focused on a particular aspect of Memory of traumatic and painful events: “If the 1980s were the decade of a happy postmodern pluralism, the 1990s seemed to be haunted by trauma as the dark underside of neoliberal triumphalism” (Huyssen 2003, 8).

Key Words: conflict archaeology, museography, architecture, difficult heritage, collective memory, exhibition design

Read the full paper here or browse REcall-project publications on ISSUU

Competition results

During the recent consortium meeting celebrated in Newcastle, the different partners of the REcall project have selected the winning groups that will take part in the workshops to be celebrated in Falstad and Rome. The winners are:

 

FALSTAD WS (24th-30th June 2013)

See all material on the Falstad WS here!

Disfocused team (site: The Falstad Forest)
Members: Ilaria Rondina (architect), Pau Garcia Sanchez (archaeologist), Federica Romoli (artist)
RE-CALL_proposal_v4

RRR (site: The Fjord)
Members: Fabrizio Bellomo (artist), Piergiorgio Italiano (interior designer), Birgitte M. Fjørtoft (archaeologist)
31_RRR

Chalk circle (site: The path from the Camp area to the forest)
Members: Micol Rispoli (architect), Lùa Coderch (artist), Giovanni Murro (archaeologist)
Advisors: Daniela Iannella, Emanuela Murro
37_Chalk Circle

AHA (site: The Camp area)
Members: Julia Hutzler (architect), Christine Guerard (artist), Thurid Andreßen (architect)
Advisors: Dr. Eszter B. Gantner (historian)
13_AHA

Teceel (site: The Commandant’s house)
Members: Elisabeth Eulitz (architect), Cecylia Skwirzynska (architect), Tobias Doll (archaeologist)
26_teceel

 

ROME WS (8th-14th September 2013)

See all material on the Rome WS here!

Terrain Vague (site: The “Attacks” on the Ovens and the Women of Ponte dell’Industria)
Members: Julia Heslop (artist), Enrico Forestieri (architect), Sophie Anderton (archaeologist)
38_Terrain Vague

Blank (site: The Schoolboy Partisan: Ugo Forno)
Members: Isabel Lima (artist), Lily Garnett (archaeologist), Toby Lloyd (artist)
22_Blank

Pigeon the message (site: The Clandestine Front of the “Carabinieri”)
Members: Tim Wouters, Filip van Dingenen (artist), PereyraLautaro (architect)
30_the homing pigeon as a messenger copy

Diogenes (site: The silent resistance of priests and nuns)
Members: Arno Geesink (architect), Julia van der Krieke (archaeologist), Beata Labuhn (philosopher)
40_Diogenes

The Trojan horse (site: The Quadraro “Republic” and Operation Whale)
Members: Juan Carlos Mejía del Valle (Architect) Henar Riviere (Art Historian), Roberto Uribe Castro (Artist)
Advisors: Horacio González Cesteros (archaeologist), Iñigo Giner Miranda (composer and musician/performer)
05_the trojan horse

Falstad WS book

falst

Contents

.

01. REcall project

About

 

02. Falstad Workshop

The Falstad Landscape

Sites

· Site01: The camp area

· Site02: The Falstad forest

· Site03: The Commandant’s house

· Site04: The Fjord

· Site05: The pathway from the Camp area to the forest

 

03. Extra material

04. Others

05. Workshop agenda

 

01. REcall project

About

REcall seeks to formulate a new role of the architectural environment based on invigorated research on the cultural landscapes of WWI and WWII and strengthen the attention on the management, documentation and preservation of this heritage.The project regards heritage as a dynamic process, involving the declaration of our memory of past events and actions that have been refashioned for present day purposes such as identity, community, legalisation of power and authority. The project group see that any cultural landscape – i.e. architecture- is characterized by its dynamism, temporality and changing priorities in social perception.We stress
that the research we develop will generate the values to be protected tomorrow. On the strength of this account, our project proposes the development of sustainable and innovative architectural practices for reuse, valorisation and communication of the XXth Century European Conflict Heritage considered as Cultural Landscape.

02. Falstad Workshop

The Falstad Landscape

Approximately 500 prisoner of war camps existed in Norway between 1940 and 1945. After the war a vast majority of the camps were torn down and eradicated, partially or completely. Today, there is little physical evidence left from these camps. Thus, Falstad is one of the few places that still has a potential, nationally and internationally, for conveying this part of the Norwegian history of WW II imprisonment. At Falstad, the most extensive physical changes to the infrastructure and the main building took place in 1949-50. During the 1950s the prison barracks, fences and watchtowers were removed, whilst the main building has been rebuilt several times after 1945.

The Falstad Landscape is in general dominated by fields and spruce forest. Many of the elements that make up the wartime landscape, such as the camp area, the Falstad Forest, the Quarry, the Commandant’s House and the farm above the camp, is situated on a larger, flat stretch of land surrounded by wooded hills. To the east of the camp area lies river Byaelva which follows the landscape from the south to the Falstadbukta bay in the north. There is a sight-line from the Falstad Forest towards the Fjord, with the camp area itself centrally situated in the landscape. A visible connection between the different places, however, is lacking, making the elements constituting the war landscape appear as separate units. One measure in connecting the camp area with the Falstad Forest, was the establishment of a new path in 2008-11, along the Byaelva river. This pathway constitutes one of the sites chosen for the REcall workshop at Falstad in June. The landscape is currently used for farming and recreation for the local population, and to a lesser extent used by visitors to the Falstad Centre.  Most visitors use a car to transport themselves between the prison area and the Falstad Forest. The mode of transport may influence how the landscape is experienced.

Today, traces of the history of the Nazi Camp are covered by vegetation, trees and green surfaces. The landscape may be considered beautiful and idyllic. Furthermore, it might be interpreted as a reflection of the history and development after the dramatic war years, where the healing of wounds was an important and necessary social process.

Visitors come to the Falstad Centre with different backgrounds which inform their experience of the landscape, and there is a need to provide visitors with better information and knowledge. Depending on the target group, prior knowledge and the purpose of the visit, different approaches need to be used in order to enable the visitors to experience the different stories of the landscape. An “explanation” of the landscape does not necessarily need great intervention to the various sites such as the Falstad Forest, the Quarry, the Commandant’s House, or the Pathway. This, however, constitutes an important challenge to the REcall teams arriving at Falstad in June this year.


Interview with professor and cultural historian James Young visiting the Falstad Landscape in 2010.


Site01: The Camp area

camp area
On 10 November 1941, the first prisoners arrived at Falstad. In total, approximately 4 200 people were imprisoned at Falstad in the years 1941-1945. The largest groups of prisoners were Norwegian political prisoners, Prisoners-of-War and forced labourers from the Soviet Union and Yugoslavia. More than 15 nationalities were present in a multicultural community of prisoners.Approximately 200 people were executed in the Falstad Forest, the camp’s execution site.Today, there are few remnants and traces left of the SS Strafgefangenenlager Falstad. The barbed wire fences, the barracks, the watchtowers and most of the main buildings and work buildings were dismantled and removed from the site around 1950.Sources:

Site02: The Falstad Forest

134_3424
As far as we know, 43 Norwegians, 74 Yugoslavs and more than 100 Soviet citizens were executed in the Falstad Forest during World War II. The exact number is uncertain. Other nationalities may also have been executed. According to witnesses, around twenty victims were exhumed and lowered into the Trondheim Fjord.After Liberation, over 40 graves were located and marked with wooden crosses. The Yugoslavian prisoner Ljuban Vukovic had an important role in finding the bodies. During the war he and three Soviet prisoners had dug most of the graves.After the war, all known graves were opened. The Norwegian victims were identified and buried either in their place of origin or in the Nidaros Cathedral Cemetery in Trondheim. In the early 1950s, Eastern European victims were moved to war cemeteries in Trondheim. There are probably still unopened graves in the old place of execution. In 1989 the Falstad Forest was given statutory protection as a World War II grave site.Sources:

Site03: The Commandant’s house

DSC_0010
The Commandant’s House was built by the prisoners and was habitable by the turn of the year 1943-1944. It contained an officer’s mess, a firing range, a bowling lane, a wine cellar and a sitting room with a fireplace. After the War the director of Innherad Forced Labour Camp lived here. The building later became part of the special school for the mentally deranged. By the end of the 1990s it was privately owned. Today the former Commandant’s House is owned by Statsbygg, the Norwegian Public Construction and Property Management. The Falstad Centre uses the building for exhibitions, offices and education.Falstad prison camp had a total number of six commandants in the years 1941-1945. None of them were prosecuted in the postwar trials. Their officer in command, Gestapo leader Gerhard Flesch, received the death penalty in the Frostating Court of Appeal. He was shot in Trondheim on 28 February 1948.Sources:

Site04: The Fjord

In the days between 4 May and 6 May 1945, several graves in the Falstad Forest were opened by the Nazi Security Police. The bodies from the graves were transported to the quayside and from there transported in a boat along the fjord before finally being sunk into an unknown place. The boat has never been located. We do not know how many of the executed Falstad prisoners who found their final resting place in this way. The quayside was also used regularly to transport prisoners to and fro the camp. Today, there are no material traces at the quayside, linking the area to the history of the SS Camp Falstad and the former site of execution.Sources:

Site05: The pathway from the Camp area to the forest

DSC_0482
This is a recently established path from the former camp area to the former execution site in the Falstad Forest. The path doesn’t follow a specific historical route between the camp and the forest, but runs along the creek Byaelva. However, the path begins near the former waste dump of the camp. Furthermore an escape route used by three prisoners in 1943 crossed the creek Byaelva somewhere along the path. The path is 1.7 kilometres long.Sources:

03. Extra material

Videos

Publications

04. Others

Submission

The submission for the second stage of the competition will include the following material:
– 4 rigid 5mm panels in A1 format (illustrating the proposal: tech drawings and visualizations with captions)
– A max 6 mins video (600 MB max) (Optional): Vimeo link
– A model of the proposal at a large scale (A1 size: the whole panel is to be used)
– Optional: a detailed model of part of the proposal (e.g.: an installation) on a A1 size board (the whole panel is to be used)
– a word file with title + 300 words synopsis + name of group participants
– Project Diary: a 64 pages booklet (the template will be delivered by organizers) illustrating the whole work process and the final proposal delivered including sketches, methodology, etc. (min 2000 words description in the whole booklet)

Calendar
– Workshop in Norway 24-30 JUN 2013.
– Workshop in Italy 8-14 SEP 2013.
– Deadline for the on-line submission* of projects based in Norway 30 OCT 2013 (h: 24:00 Italian time).
– Deadline for the on-line submission* of projects based in Italy 15 JAN 2014 (h: 24:00 Italian time).
– For the physical delivery of all required materials: all required materials should also be sent, according to the requested format, to the Closing Event venue (see 7_competition entries).
– Final workshop: place and dates will be announced at a later stage.

* For the on-line submission, photos of the model/s should be included in the form of PDF file in A4 size with a sequence of 10 pics.

Jury
The jury for the second phase of the competition will be composed by the partners of the project and other invited professionals in the fields of architecture, archaeology and art to be confirmed.

Prizes, reimbursements and subsequent commissions
At the end of the second phase the 10 teams will be presenting their proposals.

The jury will evaluate all 10 proposals and award the following prizes:
· Location Norway first prize: 3000€.
· Location Italy first prize: 3.000€.
· Location Norway second prize: 2.000€.
· Location Italy second prize: 2.000€.

Refunds
– Traveling expenses refund will take place after the delivering of both train/flight tickets and boarding cards to the Partner responsible (NTNU for Falstad WS and POLIMI for Rome WS and for the Final Event)
– All groups selected for the second phase may obtain a refund of max 1.000€ each as a compensation for the expenses that this stage involves (see section_7, second stage). Reimbursements will only be made upon delivery of related receipts/invoices to responsible Partners (NTNU for Falstad WS and POLIMI for Rome): the refund will take place (after the opening of the final exhibition) upon delivering of receipts only concerning products related to the materials to be delivered.

Ownership of materials and rights to exhibit and publish
Results of the competition and the whole research process (from the Venice WS to final workshop) will be collected in a catalogue.
All participating groups applying to the ‘Call for applications’ formally accept to keep the authorship of their works, but give the organisation the right to use the material for any purpose connected to the dissemination of the process and the results of the workshops. The organisation reserves the right to use this material without any restriction or fee. (see section_14).

05. Workshop agenda


This workshop agenda is orientative and activities may change.

Day 1 (24th June_Mon.)
Morning

  • Arrival

Afternoon / evening

  • Welcome introduction
  • REcall project goals
  • Introduction of participants and individual teams

Day 2 (25th June_Tue.)
Morning

  • Tour through sites (all 5 groups together)

Afternoon

  • Seminar on Falstad
  • Question time (collective)

Day 3 (26th June_Wed.)
Morning

  • Workshop
  • Question time (face to face)

Afternoon

  • Lecture 01 (interdisciplinary pbl)
  • Workshop
  • Question time (collective)

Day 4 (27th June_Thu.)
Morning

  • Workshop
  • Question time (face to face)

Afternoon

  • Lecture 02 (archaeology)
  • Workshop
  • Question time (collective)

Day 5 (28th June_Fri.)
Morning

  • Workshop
  • Question time (face to face)

Afternoon

  • Trip to Trondheim (with panel discussion_art)

Day 6 (29th June_Sat.)
Morning

  • Workshop
  • Question time (face to face)

Afternoon

  • Closing session (10min. presentation from each group) open to locals (municipality)
  • Discussion
  • Technical meeting (explaining the submission requirements)

Evening

  • Closing event

Day 7 (30th June_Sun.)
Morning

  • Departure

 

 

from other initiatives #004 CFP European museums 1914-1918

Call for papers

International Conference

Mars and Museum. European Museums during the First World War

Organised by:
· Bénédicte Savoy (Technische Universität Berlin),
· Petra Winter (Zentralarchiv der Staatlichen Museen zu Berlin – Preußischer Kulturbesitz),
· Christina Kott (Centre Marc Bloch Berlin, Université Panthéon-Assas Paris)

Date: September 18, 2014 – September 20, 2014

Location: Technische Universität Berlin, Strasse des 17. Juni 135, 10623 Berlin, and the Museum Hamburger
Bahnhof, Invalidenstrasse 50-51, 10557 Berlin

Submission deadline: April 30, 2013

More info: here

from other initiatives #003 Europe for citizens program 2007-2013

The aims of this Programme Guide is to assist all those interested in developing projects or receiving financial support under the “Europe for Citizens” Programme (2007-2013). It helps them understand both the objectives and the actions of the Programme and therefore the types of activities that can be supported.

It gives detailed information on what is needed to apply and what level of grant can be offered. It includes:
– a comprehensive set of information about funding opportunities under the “Europe for Citizens” Programme: essential conditions for an application for funding, explanation of the selection procedure and of general rules relevant to those applications for EU grants that are selected at the end of this procedure;
– in the interests of stability and predictability, a calendar for the submission and assessment of applications, which shall be valid for the entire duration of the Programme. This will facilitate more effective and longer-term planning for organisations interested in developing activities under this Programme;
– a detailed and stable definition of all requirements each type of project is supposed to match;
– a glossary of terms and definitions relevant to the “Europe for Citizens” Programme (see ANNEX I, p.53).

The applicability of this guide, however, is subject to fulfilment of the following conditions:
– adoption by the Commission of the annual work programme for the Europe for Citizens Programme, following its transmission to the Programme Committee;
– adoption by the European Parliament and Council of the funding required for the Europe for Citizens Programme in the framework of the annual budget of the European Union.

All forms and documents needed to apply for funding can be downloaded via the Internet addresses provided in the Chapter II.1 “Submission procedure” of this guide for ease of access for applicants (see p.14).

More information: here

from other initiatives #002 The Vienna Project

The Vienna Project is a new social action Holocaust memorial project. Slated to begin in 2013 and conclude in 2014, the Project is to be situated on the streets of Vienna and along the Danube Canal. The Vienna Project will be the first public memorial in Europe to symbolically represent multiple groups of persecuted victims of National Socialism, while also naming individual victims and dissidents on record within a given country, murdered between 1938-1945. Forging a dynamic relationship between different disciplines: art, video, typography, web design, street theater, sound art, history, archival research, and Holocaust education, The Vienna Project is envisioned as a “living” memorial based on a participatory model of engagement.

Activism

Developed through dialogue as a citizen-led initiative, The Vienna Project is a “process-based” expression of remembrance. The Memorial Project will open on the night of October 24th, 2013, preceding Austrian National Day, the commemoration of  the beginnings of the Second Republic of Austria. The Vienna Project marks the 75th anniversary year of the Anschluss in 1938, when racial persecution began in Austria; it will conclude on V-E Day (Victory in Europe Day).  The memorial project unfolds over the course of six months as a dynamic series of performative events, dedicated to stimulating fresh conversations in novel formats regarding the Holocaust and National Socialism.

Fusing public memory with participatory methodologies, the memorial project will engage the Austrian public in a communal experience of remembrance. Developed as a hyper-techno production occurring at different sites around the city, the Project will feature video projections, performance art, installation art, photography and videography, plus the introduction of a digitized memorial, prepared as a dynamic, interactive web site.

Bridging three disciplines: history (archival research), art (digital technology and street art), and Holocaust education, the memorial project is dedicated to mixing invention with accuracy, the historic record with contemporary filters, and individual engagement with social consciousness.  Each discipline makes a critical contribution to the design of the project and none of the disciplines are subservient to the others.

More info: http://theviennaproject.org/

 

REcall competition proposals

The REcall project competition has recently closed and 17 proposals have been submitted to the call. Down this entry you can see images extracted from the proposals05_the trojan horse

The Trojan Horse_

 

13_AHA

AHA_

 

20_Spei Memento

Spei Memento_

 

21_Choking on Dust

Choking on Dust_

 

22_Blank

Blank_

 

26_teceel

Teceel_

 

27_superwondergroup

Superwondergroup_

 

30_the homing pigeon as a messenger copy

The Homing Pigeon As a Messenger_

 

31_RRR

RRR_

 

33_Sibilla

Sibilla_

 

34_YU05

YU05_

 

35_Bermudez, Rytter & Torracchi

Bermudez, Rytter & Torracchi_

 

37_Chalk Circle

Chalk Circle_

 

38_Terrain Vague

Terrain Vague_

 

RE-CALL_proposal_v4

Disfocus Team_

 

40_Diogenes

Diogenes_

 

47_Co.habitation

Co.habitation_

 

 

from other initiatives #001 ATRIUM photo contest

The European project ATRIUM – Architecture of Totalitarian Regimes of the XX Century in Urban Management – focuses on the architectural heritage of the different totalitarian regimes of the twentieth century in Europe, to create a European Cultural Route. However, there are many buildings of great historical value which lie neglected all over Europe.

SPAZI INDECISI, the Municipality of Forlì, lead partner of the “ATRIUM” project and the Province of Forlì-Cesena as a project partner, announce TOTALLY LOST, a European photo and video exploration aimed at finding, registering and taking pictures of the architectural heritage of European Totalitarian Regimes, including both abandoned and still being used buildings.

The contest is implemented under the European Project “Architecture of Totalitarian Regimes of the XX Century in Urban Management – ATRIUM” funded by the South-Est Europe Transnational Cooperation Programme.

Spot, take a picture or make a video of derelict buildings or still in use, which date to the period of the Totalitarian Regimes, in the partner countries of the “Atrium” project (Albania, Bosnia-Herzegovina, Bulgaria, Croatia, Greece, Italy, Romania, Serbia, Slovakia, Slovenia and Hungary): factories, institutional buildings, dwellings, places of propaganda, places of power, etc.

SEND YOUR PHOTOS OR VIDEOS WITHIN MARCH 21, 2013 TOTOTALLYLOST@SPAZIINDECISI.IT

Your work could be part of the TOTALLY LOST exhibition which will be put on in Forlì by Spazi Indecisi inside a totalitarian building in June 2013, and subsequently in other European cities participating in the ATRIUM project.

The pictures and videos will be published in the exhibition catalogue, which will be distributed to all the photographers and video makers selected.

More info here.

Deadline extended

Due to recent unexpected problems on our server, the website has not been fully operative over the previous week and therefore we have decided to extend the competition deadlines.

Registration deadline: 28 February 2013
Application deadline: 15 March 2013

More info here.

Call description

DEADLINES HAVE BEEN EXTENDED!
Registration deadline: 28 Feb. 2013
Application deadline: 15 Mar. 2013
 

BREAKING NEWS (14.02.2013)

01. 01. Participating teams must be composed at least by 3 members, 2 of which must be a couple formed by 1 architect + 1 archaeologist either 1 architect + 1 artist either 1 archaeologist + 1 artist. The third member can be freely chosen among any other discipline.

02. All team members must hold a Bachelor degree title, that is no more than 7 years old, be a Master student or be in possession of a Master Degree title that is no more than 5 years old.

03. As for architects participating in the call, all specialisations will be accepted (architect, landscape architect, interior architect, etc.)

04. As well, we want to remind that the call has been opened as well to some countries that were not initially included in the list: FYROM, Montenegro and Serbia. Here is the full list: All participants must be citizens of any of the Member States of the European Union, EFTA countries (Iceland, Liechtenstein, Norway, Switzerland) or countries which are candidates for accession to the European Union (Croatia, Montenegro, Serbia, FYROM, Turkey).

Download the call here

Register here

This call for tenders is part of the REcall project and aims at receiving enthusiastic and thorough proposal for Difficult Heritage – such as the ones coming from XX Century conflicts and wars – re-appropriation interventions. Selected entries will be granted access to one of the two design workshops which will take place in Norway and Italy in 2013. Proposals will be guided towards a successful end, in which those selected entries will compete for a final prize involving an economic contribution.

 

In brief
1. 10 group proposals will be selected, whose members (3 members per group) will be able to participate in one of the two workshops to be celebrated in 2013 (one in Norway and one in Italy), having all the costs covered by the organisation.
2. All selected groups will receive a contribution up to 1000€ for the production of material that is to be delivered in the second stage.
3. After the second stage, winning proposals will receive prizes of 3.000€ (two first prizes) and 2.000€ (two second prizes).
4. In the end, all three members of the 10 initially selected groups will participate, having all expenses covered, in the final event composed of exhibition and conference.
5. Looking for group members to team up with? Use our facebook group to find them!

 

REcall-project
REcall seeks to formulate a new role of the architectural environment based on invigorated research on the cultural landscapes of WWI and WWII, and to strengthen the attention on the management, documentation and fruition of such a heritage.The project regards heritage as a dynamic process, involving the declaration of our memory of past events and actions that have been refashioned for present day purposes such as identity, community, legalisation of power and authority. According to the project group, any cultural landscape or urbanscape is characterised by its dynamism, temporality and changing priorities in social perception.We stress that the research we develop will generate the values to be protected tomorrow. On the strength of this account, our project proposes the development of sustainable and innovative architectural practices for reuse, valorisation and communication of the XXth Century European Conflict Heritage.

 

Participating institutions
Politecnico di Milano (coordinator)
Aalborg Universitet
Newcastle University
NTNU Trondheim
Falstad center
Museo diffuso della resistenzaIn collaboration with:
Ergan Foundation, MACBA, Romsdal Museet, Routes Agency, Snark.

 

The Prizes
REcall foresees the selection of 10 winning proposals from interdisciplinary teams (more info provided in the ‘Call for applications’ document), inviting their members to participate in one of the two workshops to take place during 2013 in Norway and Italy.All selected groups will participate in a final submission and the best proposals will receive:
– Workshop Norway (first prize): 3,000€
– Workshop Italy (first prize): 3,000€
– Workshop Norway (second prize): 2,000€
– Workshop Italy (second prize): 2,000€

 

Relevant dates
Call announcement: December 4, 2012
Registration deadline: January 30, 2013 Extended to 28 February 2013
Application deadline: February 15, 2013 Extended to 15 March 2013

 

Submission
The submission for the second stage of the competition will include the following material:
– 4 rigid 5mm panels in A1 format (illustrating the proposal: tech drawings and visualizations with captions)
– A max 6 mins video (600 MB max) (Optional): Vimeo link
– A model of the proposal at a large scale (A1 size: the whole panel is to be used)
– Optional: a detailed model of part of the proposal (e.g.: an installation) on a A1 size board (the whole panel is to be used)
– a word file with title + 300 words synopsis + name of group participants
– Project Diary: a 64 pages booklet (the template will be delivered by organizers) illustrating the whole work process and the final proposal delivered including sketches, methodology, etc. (min 2000 words description in the whole booklet)

 

Calendar
– Workshop in Norway 24-30 JUN 2013.
– Workshop in Italy 8-14 SEP 2013.
– Deadline for the on-line submission* of projects based in Norway 30 OCT 2013 (h: 24:00 Italian time).
– Deadline for the on-line submission* of projects based in Italy 15 JAN 2014 (h: 24:00 Italian time).
– For the physical delivery of all required materials: all required materials should also be sent, with exclusion of the video, in analogical form according to the format requested to the Closing Event venue (see 7_competition entries).
– Final workshop: place and dates will be announced at a later stage.

* For the on-line submission, photos of the model/s should be included in the form of PDF file in A4 size with a sequence of 10 pics.

 

Specifications
All participants must be citizens of any of the Member States of the European Union, EFTA countries (Iceland, Liechtenstein, Norway, Switzerland) or countries which are candidates for accession to the European Union (Croatia, Montenegro, Serbia, FYROM, Turkey).[issuu width=606 height=377 embedBackground=%23000000 backgroundColor=%23222222 documentId=130216111616-c79dfffd6ce1437ab8d17223920da6cb name=call_v9.0_fr username=recall-project tag=call unit=px v=2]

A Jewish Story / Venice WS report

Civic Hospital ‘SS. Giovanni e Paolo’Campo SS. Giovanni e Paolo, Castello 6363 – Venice (7 October 1944)

Between the end of 1943 and 1944 the Jews of Venice were deported to the camp Fossoli, to be then sent to Auschwitz. In the city, men, women and children were rounded up in prisons or in other areas, such as Foscarini School, transformed into a place of detention, as a plaque posted in 2000 reminds.

Especially dramatic was the summer of 1944, when the SS command (leaded by Franz Stangl), based in Trieste, and before that at Treblinka, moved to Venice. The machinery of deportation did not stop even in front of elders and sick people. In August 1944, seventy people were deported from the Elderly Care House of Israelite along with the hospital’s chief rabbi who had refused to leave.

While in October, the patients at city hospitals (saints John and Paul, San Clemente and San Servolo) were to be locked up in the chamber housing of the Main City Hospital, waiting to be sent first to Trieste, then to Auschwitz. Out of the 246 deported prisoners, only 8 returned to Venice.

Provided material: A Jewish story

See the workshop results here

 

Document
[issuu width=606 height=377 embedBackground=%23000000 backgroundColor=%23222222 documentId=130510083038-25bc967248aa4edf9c8516523893706e name=call_v9.0_fr username=recall-project tag=call unit=px v=2]

Presentation

A Jewish Story 500MB-H.264 from recall-project on Vimeo.

Location

See A Jewish story in a bigger map

Anti raid shelters / Venice WS report

Every object or structure made by man is a part of our material culture. These objects or structures provide important information for our understanding of technologies, economies, ritual practices and social organization of our human past. This is not only the case for ancient history, but also for our more recent historical remains such as the material culture from World War 2. This material culture provides us with information about the resources used in the building process and the relationship between material culture and human behaviour. Venice was never actually bombed, but the anti raid shelters were still an important element of security for the citizens in case of a attack. They were built of poor concrete made of small stones, bricks and wood. Another aspect which is peculiar to Venice is that the shelters were built above ground. This makes the few that are left visible in the landscape. 

The Air Raid Shelters in Venice (and in other parts of Europe) can give us useful information and evoke memories on subjects already forgotten, as this information and knowledge disappears every day. The contrast between the classical architecture in Venice and the remains from these military constructions is overwhelming. Being aware of these historical remains we are also able to communicate and reflecting about an important part of human history. 

Our goal is to gain attention to theses buildings so that they can be re-discovered and hopefully reflected on, not just as old irrelevant buildings falling apart, but as memory of a turbulent and difficult time in European history.

Provided material: Anti-raid shelters

See the workshop results here
 

Document
[issuu width=606 height=377 embedBackground=%23000000 backgroundColor=%23222222 documentId=130510083211-9913808487574655b0431f45b0fdb42c name=call_v9.0_fr username=recall-project tag=call unit=px v=2]

Presentation

Location

See Anti-raid shelter in a bigger map

Marinaretti / Venice WS report

Since the annexation of Venice to the Kingdom of Italy, the former convent space adjacent to major shipyards of the Arsenale housed the school for non – commissioned mechanical officers, managed by officers and staff of the Navy. Many teenagers from all over Italy attended the school, hosted in the former convent of Celestia and in the training ship “Scilla” anchored at Sant’Elena.The first German occupants in Venice, in the Autumn 1943, considered the ‘sailor’ students as soldiers because of their uniform, and decided to deport them as IMI (Italian Military Internees). But during the walk from the Arsenale to the station, many Venetians reacted, urging the boys to escape. Arrived at Holy Apostles Church, some indicated safety ‘Calli’ where to slip out of lane. At the Ponte delle Guglie, women in the market began to scream urging them to escape, many children ran to the Ghetto or along the foundation of Cannaregio, taking off their uniform and throwing it into the canal. Eleven entered an open gate and were saved, hidden by the inhabitants of the house.An unregistered number of children was finally deported by train from the Santa Lucia station. 

Provided material: ‘Marinaretti’ story

See the workshop results here

Document
[issuu width=606 height=377 embedBackground=%23000000 backgroundColor=%23222222 documentId=130510083232-56b07493961e43bc9234ea8937342ab2 name=call_v9.0_fr username=recall-project tag=call unit=px v=2]

Presentation

Location

See Marinaretti in a bigger map

Nazi calle arrow / Venice WS report

Only one sign of Nazi orientation system still remains in Venice, in a narrow calle near one of the most popular place of the city: Campo Santa Margherita. The arrow showed the way to the “Platzkommandantur”, that is the Nazi command located in Piazza San Marco, where a Nazi flag flew constantly, while Venice was occupied from 1943 to 45.Many prisoners had to pass here to reach the Nazi main head quarter since the little calle is also on the way from the railway station to the central square of Venice.Just a step from Campo Santa Margherita, now new yellow signs suggest other paths to reach the station or Piazza San Marco and the Nazi arrow remains, almost illegible, on the crumbled plaster of an old house, as a melting memory.The sign was apparently painted on the wall in September of 1943.

Provided material: Nazi calle arrow

See the workshop results here

 

Document
[issuu width=606 height=377 embedBackground=%23000000 backgroundColor=%23222222 documentId=130510082959-e7f96a5365734212bbe12c2ebffdc324 name=call_v9.0_fr username=recall-project tag=call unit=px v=2]

Presentation
Visit the presentation site here

Location

See Nazi calle arrow in a bigger map

Harry’s bar / Venice WS report

Harry’s Bar was opened in 1931 by Giuseppe Cipriani with help from the American Harry Pickering. The tales goes that Cipriani loaned Pickering 10.000 lire and in return he gave Cipriani 50.000 lire 2 years later with the words: “Here’s the money. And to show you my appreciation, here’s 40.000 more, enough to open a bar. We will call it Harry’s Bar.” The bar had from the beginning an American identity, and many celebrities visited the bar where several trademark dishes and drinks were invented. The international orientation coursed the Cipriani family severe trouble during the fascist rule in Italy, where the name of the bar was changed to Bar Arrigo. 

Provided material: Harry’s bar

See the workshop results here

Document
[issuu width=606 height=377 embedBackground=%23000000 backgroundColor=%23222222 documentId=130510083145-6c9c1828d42a4f77a626c210447a8934 name=call_v9.0_fr username=recall-project tag=call unit=px v=2]

Presentation

Location

See Harry’s bar in a bigger map

Operation Bowler / Venice WS report

Operation Bowler was the name of an attack on the Port of Venice in 1945. Extremely localised, it was seen as a grand success as it evaded the destruction of Venice’s historical buildings. The name ‘Operation Bowler’ referred to the threat imposed by the British air force that if any of Venice’s historical buildings got damaged in the bombings then the people responsible within the force would be ‘bowler-hatted’: asked to leave their position and once again become a civilian (going back to wearing a bowler hat). Allied propaganda promoted the bombings as a complete success although twenty-five people died as a result of the bombings, when a house collapsed in the centre of the neighbourhood of Santa Marta. 

Provided material: Operation bowler

See the workshop results here

Document
[issuu width=606 height=377 embedBackground=%23000000 backgroundColor=%23222222 documentId=130510083057-524f7d1ad65443c896a4c0e8c8405d09 name=call_v9.0_fr username=recall-project tag=call unit=px v=2]

Presentation

Operation Bowler – REcall-dow – Venice WS SEP 2012 from recall-project on Vimeo.

Location

See Operation Bowler in a bigger map

WS Norway Jun 2013

24th-30th June 2013
Research by design activity aimed at envisioning projects in consistency with -the issues pointed out in the Call. Two-days visits to the case-study sites will provide direct knowledge of the project areas and identification of specific requirements suggested by the hosting institutions. The workshop activities will comprise teamwork, conferences, seminars, lectures and communications from local administration.

Specific objectives: 

  •  Expose the participants to the multidisciplinary and multicultural know-how of the involved partners.
  •  Promote the transnational mobility of participants.
  •  Promote intercultural and interdisciplinary dialogue

Specific output:

  • Update on the workshops’ progresses and results on the dedicated blog of the project.

Other info:

Read about the sites and program of the event here.

See the competition winning proposals whose participants will participate in the workshops in Norway and Rome

WS Italy Sep 2013

8th-14th September 2013
Research by design activity aimed at envisioning projects in consistency with -the issues pointed out in the Call. The workshop activities will comprise teamwork, conferences, seminars, lectures and communications from local administration.Specific objectives: 

  • Expose the participants to the multidisciplinary and multicultural know-how of the involved partners.
  • Promote the transnational mobility of participants.
  • Promote intercultural and interdisciplinary dialogue.

Specific output:

  • Update on the workshops’ progresses and results on the dedicated blog of the project.

 

With the collaboration of:
Footer_Routesagency_140x60

Closing event Spring 2014

Spring 2014 (dates to be specified)Intensive 3-days workshop (to be held during Spring 2014) with the participation of all participants, professors and tutors for project wrap-up, editing and elaboration of project deliverables for final evaluation.Submission

The submission for the second stage of the competition will include the following material:
– 4 rigid 5mm panels in A1 format (illustrating the proposal: tech drawings and visualizations with captions)
– A max 6 mins video (600 MB max) (Optional): Vimeo link
– A model of the proposal at a large scale (A1 size: the whole panel is to be used)
– Optional: a detailed model of part of the proposal (e.g.: an installation) on a A1 size board (the whole panel is to be used)
– a word file with title + 300 words synopsis + name of group participants
– Project Diary: a 64 pages booklet (the template will be delivered by organizers) illustrating the whole work process and the final proposal delivered including sketches, methodology, etc. (min 2000 words description in the whole booklet)

Jury
The jury for the second phase of the competition will be composed by the partners of the project and other invited professionals in the fields of architecture, archaeology and art to be confirmed.

On the basis of the presented materials, the Evaluation Committee will identify the first and second prize winners for each workshop. The Evaluation Committee will comprise one member from each partner institution and two invited keynote speakers.

Prizes
At the end of the second phase the 10 teams will be presenting their proposals.
The jury will evaluate all 10 proposals and award the following prizes:
· Location Norway first prize: 3000€.
· Location Italy first prize: 3.000€.
· Location Norway second prize: 2.000€.
· Location Italy second prize: 2.000€.

 

WS Venice Session

Thursday 13th September
h 14:30
Giardini della Biennale
Padiglione Centrale

Room F

Flyer

Poster

 

On Thursday the 13th, the participants to the REcall – Venice WWII ‘Sories & Places’ workshop (9-13 September – IUAV Santa Marta – aula O2) will present their outcomes on the four days intensive work on Venice WWII forgotten memories. The six interdisciplinary teams, gathering together artists, archaeologists and architects, have been working respectively on six specific forgotten stories/places related to the world war II in Venice.

The goal set for all teams was to elaborate and realize a work (performance, installation, etc.) able to ‘recall’ the forgotten story they had been assigned, avoiding any ‘simplicistic’ commemorialization. Teams all shared the idea and convincement that none memories can be really ‘recalled’ – avoiding to slip into the oblivion – without people participatory acts of involvement: memory is an ever alive object always involving the subject in a continue action of negotiation. A dance that continually reconfigures both the object and the subject.

With the help of tutors affiliated to the four institutions involved (AAU, POLIMI, NTUN, UNEW) in the workshop, participants walked on the fragile and difficult path of ‘painful memories’ developing their proposal and realizing their contribution to a possible ‘recall’.

Group 01
Story: ‘Marinaretti’ story‘
Participants: Esben, Francisco, Sara, Birgitte
Report: ‘Marinaretti’ story’
Presentation:

 

Group 02
Story: ‘Nazi calle arrow’
Participants: Hans, Martina, Silje
Report: ‘Nazi calle arrow’
Presentation: visit the presentation site here

 

Group 03
Story: ‘Harry’s bar’
Participants: Mads, Claudia, Toby
Report: ‘Harry’s bar’
Presentation:

 

Group 04
Story: ‘Anti-raid shelter’
Participants: Elias, Gaia, Arve
Report: ‘Anti-raid shelter’
Presentation:

 

Group 05
Story: ‘Operation Bowler’
Participants: Patrik, Enrico, Julia
Report: ‘Operation Bowler’
Presentation:

 

Group 06
Story: ‘a Jewish story’
Participants: Martin, Rune, Isabel
Report: ‘a Jewish story’
Presentation:

 

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WS Venice Sep 2012

9-13 September 2012

The Venice workshop has for REcall a double challenge: is the occasion for launching officially (and in public) the project and also to test the quality and the quantity of its research queries. But the choice of Venice is not by chance, but a carefully elaborated decision connected to the specific concept behind the fore coming 13th Architecture Biennale titled ‘Common Ground’.In the words of the curator, the international known architect David Cipperfiled:Within the context of the Architecture Biennale, ‘Common Ground’ evokes the image not only of shared space and shared ideas but of a rich ground of history, experience, image and language. Layers of explicit and subliminal material form our memories and shape our judgements. While we struggle to orient ourselves in a continuously changing world, what we are familiar with is an inevitable part of our ability to understand our place. It is critical that our expectations and our history don’t become a justification for sentimentality or resistance to progress. We must therefore articulate better our evaluations and prejudices if we are not to regard what has come before as something to escape and if we are to give value to a cumulative and evolving architectural culture rather than a random flow of meaningless images and forms.

Stories:

Group 01
Story: ‘Marinaretti’ story‘

Group 02
Story: ‘Nazi calle arrow’

Group 03
Story: ‘Harry’s bar’

Group 04
Story: ‘Anti-raid shelter’

Group 05
Story: ‘Operation Bowler’

Group 06
Story: ‘a Jewish story’

 

Click on the map pins for descriptions


See REcall_Venice WWII ‘Places&Stories’ in a bigger map

 

Participants

Promotional postcard

Flyer

Poster

 

With the contribution of:

ISVER

REcall is on air

REcall DoW seeks to formulate a new role of the architectural environment based on invigorated research on the cultural landscapes of WWI and WWII and strengthen the attention on the management, documentation and preservation of this heritage.

The project regards heritage as a dynamic process, involving the declaration of our memory of past events and actions that have been refashioned for present day purposes such as identity, community, legalisation of power and authority. The project group see that any cultural landscape – i.e. architecture- is characterized by its dynamism, temporality and changing priorities in social perception.We stress that the research we develop will generate the values to be protected tomorrow. On the strength of this account, our project proposes the development of sustainable and innovative architectural practices for reuse, valorisation and communication of the XXth Century European Conflict Heritage considered as Cultural Landscape.

Main Partners









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Museum Partners Associate Partners