A Jewish Story / Venice WS report

Civic Hospital ‘SS. Giovanni e Paolo’Campo SS. Giovanni e Paolo, Castello 6363 – Venice (7 October 1944)

Between the end of 1943 and 1944 the Jews of Venice were deported to the camp Fossoli, to be then sent to Auschwitz. In the city, men, women and children were rounded up in prisons or in other areas, such as Foscarini School, transformed into a place of detention, as a plaque posted in 2000 reminds.

Especially dramatic was the summer of 1944, when the SS command (leaded by Franz Stangl), based in Trieste, and before that at Treblinka, moved to Venice. The machinery of deportation did not stop even in front of elders and sick people. In August 1944, seventy people were deported from the Elderly Care House of Israelite along with the hospital’s chief rabbi who had refused to leave.

While in October, the patients at city hospitals (saints John and Paul, San Clemente and San Servolo) were to be locked up in the chamber housing of the Main City Hospital, waiting to be sent first to Trieste, then to Auschwitz. Out of the 246 deported prisoners, only 8 returned to Venice.

Provided material: A Jewish story

See the workshop results here

 

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Presentation

A Jewish Story 500MB-H.264 from recall-project on Vimeo.

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Anti raid shelters / Venice WS report

Every object or structure made by man is a part of our material culture. These objects or structures provide important information for our understanding of technologies, economies, ritual practices and social organization of our human past. This is not only the case for ancient history, but also for our more recent historical remains such as the material culture from World War 2. This material culture provides us with information about the resources used in the building process and the relationship between material culture and human behaviour. Venice was never actually bombed, but the anti raid shelters were still an important element of security for the citizens in case of a attack. They were built of poor concrete made of small stones, bricks and wood. Another aspect which is peculiar to Venice is that the shelters were built above ground. This makes the few that are left visible in the landscape. 

The Air Raid Shelters in Venice (and in other parts of Europe) can give us useful information and evoke memories on subjects already forgotten, as this information and knowledge disappears every day. The contrast between the classical architecture in Venice and the remains from these military constructions is overwhelming. Being aware of these historical remains we are also able to communicate and reflecting about an important part of human history. 

Our goal is to gain attention to theses buildings so that they can be re-discovered and hopefully reflected on, not just as old irrelevant buildings falling apart, but as memory of a turbulent and difficult time in European history.

Provided material: Anti-raid shelters

See the workshop results here
 

Document
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Presentation

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Marinaretti / Venice WS report

Since the annexation of Venice to the Kingdom of Italy, the former convent space adjacent to major shipyards of the Arsenale housed the school for non – commissioned mechanical officers, managed by officers and staff of the Navy. Many teenagers from all over Italy attended the school, hosted in the former convent of Celestia and in the training ship “Scilla” anchored at Sant’Elena.The first German occupants in Venice, in the Autumn 1943, considered the ‘sailor’ students as soldiers because of their uniform, and decided to deport them as IMI (Italian Military Internees). But during the walk from the Arsenale to the station, many Venetians reacted, urging the boys to escape. Arrived at Holy Apostles Church, some indicated safety ‘Calli’ where to slip out of lane. At the Ponte delle Guglie, women in the market began to scream urging them to escape, many children ran to the Ghetto or along the foundation of Cannaregio, taking off their uniform and throwing it into the canal. Eleven entered an open gate and were saved, hidden by the inhabitants of the house.An unregistered number of children was finally deported by train from the Santa Lucia station. 

Provided material: ‘Marinaretti’ story

See the workshop results here

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Nazi calle arrow / Venice WS report

Only one sign of Nazi orientation system still remains in Venice, in a narrow calle near one of the most popular place of the city: Campo Santa Margherita. The arrow showed the way to the “Platzkommandantur”, that is the Nazi command located in Piazza San Marco, where a Nazi flag flew constantly, while Venice was occupied from 1943 to 45.Many prisoners had to pass here to reach the Nazi main head quarter since the little calle is also on the way from the railway station to the central square of Venice.Just a step from Campo Santa Margherita, now new yellow signs suggest other paths to reach the station or Piazza San Marco and the Nazi arrow remains, almost illegible, on the crumbled plaster of an old house, as a melting memory.The sign was apparently painted on the wall in September of 1943.

Provided material: Nazi calle arrow

See the workshop results here

 

Document
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Presentation
Visit the presentation site here

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Harry’s bar / Venice WS report

Harry’s Bar was opened in 1931 by Giuseppe Cipriani with help from the American Harry Pickering. The tales goes that Cipriani loaned Pickering 10.000 lire and in return he gave Cipriani 50.000 lire 2 years later with the words: “Here’s the money. And to show you my appreciation, here’s 40.000 more, enough to open a bar. We will call it Harry’s Bar.” The bar had from the beginning an American identity, and many celebrities visited the bar where several trademark dishes and drinks were invented. The international orientation coursed the Cipriani family severe trouble during the fascist rule in Italy, where the name of the bar was changed to Bar Arrigo. 

Provided material: Harry’s bar

See the workshop results here

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Operation Bowler / Venice WS report

Operation Bowler was the name of an attack on the Port of Venice in 1945. Extremely localised, it was seen as a grand success as it evaded the destruction of Venice’s historical buildings. The name ‘Operation Bowler’ referred to the threat imposed by the British air force that if any of Venice’s historical buildings got damaged in the bombings then the people responsible within the force would be ‘bowler-hatted’: asked to leave their position and once again become a civilian (going back to wearing a bowler hat). Allied propaganda promoted the bombings as a complete success although twenty-five people died as a result of the bombings, when a house collapsed in the centre of the neighbourhood of Santa Marta. 

Provided material: Operation bowler

See the workshop results here

Document
[issuu width=606 height=377 embedBackground=%23000000 backgroundColor=%23222222 documentId=130510083057-524f7d1ad65443c896a4c0e8c8405d09 name=call_v9.0_fr username=recall-project tag=call unit=px v=2]

Presentation

Operation Bowler – REcall-dow – Venice WS SEP 2012 from recall-project on Vimeo.

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WS Venice Session

Thursday 13th September
h 14:30
Giardini della Biennale
Padiglione Centrale

Room F

Flyer

Poster

 

On Thursday the 13th, the participants to the REcall – Venice WWII ‘Sories & Places’ workshop (9-13 September – IUAV Santa Marta – aula O2) will present their outcomes on the four days intensive work on Venice WWII forgotten memories. The six interdisciplinary teams, gathering together artists, archaeologists and architects, have been working respectively on six specific forgotten stories/places related to the world war II in Venice.

The goal set for all teams was to elaborate and realize a work (performance, installation, etc.) able to ‘recall’ the forgotten story they had been assigned, avoiding any ‘simplicistic’ commemorialization. Teams all shared the idea and convincement that none memories can be really ‘recalled’ – avoiding to slip into the oblivion – without people participatory acts of involvement: memory is an ever alive object always involving the subject in a continue action of negotiation. A dance that continually reconfigures both the object and the subject.

With the help of tutors affiliated to the four institutions involved (AAU, POLIMI, NTUN, UNEW) in the workshop, participants walked on the fragile and difficult path of ‘painful memories’ developing their proposal and realizing their contribution to a possible ‘recall’.

Group 01
Story: ‘Marinaretti’ story‘
Participants: Esben, Francisco, Sara, Birgitte
Report: ‘Marinaretti’ story’
Presentation:

 

Group 02
Story: ‘Nazi calle arrow’
Participants: Hans, Martina, Silje
Report: ‘Nazi calle arrow’
Presentation: visit the presentation site here

 

Group 03
Story: ‘Harry’s bar’
Participants: Mads, Claudia, Toby
Report: ‘Harry’s bar’
Presentation:

 

Group 04
Story: ‘Anti-raid shelter’
Participants: Elias, Gaia, Arve
Report: ‘Anti-raid shelter’
Presentation:

 

Group 05
Story: ‘Operation Bowler’
Participants: Patrik, Enrico, Julia
Report: ‘Operation Bowler’
Presentation:

 

Group 06
Story: ‘a Jewish story’
Participants: Martin, Rune, Isabel
Report: ‘a Jewish story’
Presentation:

 

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WS Venice Sep 2012

9-13 September 2012

The Venice workshop has for REcall a double challenge: is the occasion for launching officially (and in public) the project and also to test the quality and the quantity of its research queries. But the choice of Venice is not by chance, but a carefully elaborated decision connected to the specific concept behind the fore coming 13th Architecture Biennale titled ‘Common Ground’.In the words of the curator, the international known architect David Cipperfiled:Within the context of the Architecture Biennale, ‘Common Ground’ evokes the image not only of shared space and shared ideas but of a rich ground of history, experience, image and language. Layers of explicit and subliminal material form our memories and shape our judgements. While we struggle to orient ourselves in a continuously changing world, what we are familiar with is an inevitable part of our ability to understand our place. It is critical that our expectations and our history don’t become a justification for sentimentality or resistance to progress. We must therefore articulate better our evaluations and prejudices if we are not to regard what has come before as something to escape and if we are to give value to a cumulative and evolving architectural culture rather than a random flow of meaningless images and forms.

Stories:

Group 01
Story: ‘Marinaretti’ story‘

Group 02
Story: ‘Nazi calle arrow’

Group 03
Story: ‘Harry’s bar’

Group 04
Story: ‘Anti-raid shelter’

Group 05
Story: ‘Operation Bowler’

Group 06
Story: ‘a Jewish story’

 

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See REcall_Venice WWII ‘Places&Stories’ in a bigger map

 

Participants

Promotional postcard

Flyer

Poster

 

With the contribution of:

ISVER